Normal Service Delayed While My Head Explodes

I was going to start updating Brunswick tonight after finishing the play on Friday, but I’m still wiped out. The strip may be getting a bit more publicity on the 1st of April, so I’ll try to be vaguely up-to-date by then. The play has six musical numbers, stars Fitz, and has the potential to be the most monumentally daft thing to ever appear on stage at Bats, so more about that in April as well.

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Finn isn’t heartless, he just gets distracted easily. And the story to follow is completely true and happened to me on Thursday. How’s that for a teaser? My Marketing degree hasn’t gone to waste.

I have a reading of the Brunswick play on Wednesday. Capital Times mentioned it last week. The editor was in a hurry, so I’m changing my name to Brant to match the article, and Jitterati is now Jiterati. Does anyone actually know anyone called Brant? It sounds like an aftershave.

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It’s like pulling teeth, isn’t it? And, of course, it’s going such interesting places.
Brunswick has been nominated for an Eric Award for Best Strip -New Zealand’s major comic awards… well, the only one that exists independently of a retail outlet or the Qantas Media Awards. Ironically the major competition I’m up against is… myself, for Jitterati. Let’s hope the plot’s gone somewhere by the time the judges (including Joe Sacco and Dylan Horrocks) take a look at it.

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Mad Night by Richard Sala

Mad Night by Richard Sala
Fantagraphics Books 2005

Collected from Richard Sala’s comic Evil Eye, where it was more logically titled ‘Reflection in a Glass Scorpion’. This is a long, noirish fable that could almost be cute enough to be an Archie comic if it weren’t for the large number of lovingly rendered stabbings. Girl detective Judy Drood investigates a series of grisly murders at Lone Mountain College, a gothic institution set in a strangely European-looking town. The male characters are grotesqueries and the women look vaguely alike, which is why their relentless extermination (studded throughout the complicated plot like raisins in a raisin biscuit) is so distressing. If you’d prefer Edward Gorey to have eyeball-eating rats and girl pirates instead of ennui, this is for you.

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